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Body Count at Barry

By Musa Laity

Sex is always a relevant topic on college campuses. Body counts, on the other hand, are a little more difficult to discuss.


Urban Dictionary, online pop-culture concordance, defines a body count as the number of sexual partners a person has accrued over a sexual lifespan. Numbers can be subjectively understood as too high or too low and stigma follows both extremes.


According to a Harvard medical review survey, the results showed that men are generally celebrated for having large numbers of sexual partners whereas women are often degraded for the same behavior.


How do Barry students view the subject of body count? The Buccaneer took to the streets of Barry to find out.


Bio: A female age 18 majoring in nursing. She is a student athlete who has a body count of 15.


Reporter: “Are you sexually active?”

Student: “Yes.”

Reporter: What’s your body count?”

Student: “15.”

Reporter: How do you feel about that number?”

Student: “It could be way higher. Guys are desperate. I still feel like mine is high compared to a lot of other girls, but I have issues and sex is a good distraction.”


Interviewee: A female age 28 majoring in psychology. She has a body count of 15.5.


Reporter: “Are you sexually active?”

Student: “Yes”

Reporter: What’s your body count?”

Student: “15.5.”

Reporter: What do you mean by .5?”

Student: “Well oral doesn’t really count as the whole number. Give me a few weeks I’ll get that number up.”


Interviewee: A male age 22 majoring in history. He has a body count of 22.


Reporter: “Are you sexually active?”

Student: “Yes.”

Reporter: What’s your body count?”

Student: “22.”

Reporter: “Some would say that’s a high number. How do you feel about it?”

Student: “I’ve actually slowed down a lot. If I kept going at the pace I was going before, I guarantee it would've been higher.”


Interviewee: A female age 20 majoring in history. She has no body count.


Reporter: “Are you sexually active?”

Student: “No.”

Reporter: “So that means your body count is zero?”

Student: “Yeah.”

Reporter: “Are you saving yourself for marriage or waiting until you’re ready?”

Student: “No, I’m not saving myself and I am ready, I just don’t think these guys are ready for me.”


Interviewee: A female age 19 majoring in political science. She has a body count of about 35-40.


Reporter: “Are you sexually active?”

Student: “Yes, very.”

Reporter: “So then what’s your body count?”

Student: “Whoa definitely over 35. I would say between 35-40.”

Reporter: “Wow that’s probably the highest number I’ve heard so far. Why would you say your number is so high?”

Student: “Well I’ve always been a curious teenager. I don’t know I just like new experiences, I guess it’s curiosity.”

Reporter: “Do you tend to try different types of people?”

Student: “No, not at all I definitely have a type and I stick to it.”


Interviewee: A male age 20 majoring in biology. He has a body count of 4.


Reporter: “Are you sexually active?”

Student: “Yes”

Reporter: What’s your body count?”

Student: “4.”


Interviewee: A male age 18 majoring in computer science. He has no body count.


Reporter: “Are you sexually active?”

Student: “No.”

Reporter: “Why is that?”

Student: “I’m saving myself for marriage, I am a man of God”

Reporter: “Do you find it difficult to practice abstinence on campus?”

Student: “I’m not going to lie, yes. Sex is so easy that it has lost its meaning. I envy students that can have sex with no strings attached and move on to the next. That’s just not me. It’s easy to abstain but I’m not alone and I know one day I’ll find the right one.”

Reporter: “Do your friends know you’re a virgin?”

Student: “No, everyone just assumes I’m having sex but it’s no secret. If you ask me, I’ll tell you.”

The Buccaneer